Gary Scott

decisive thoughts for precise living

To the extent that the word ‘desegregation’ remains in our vocabulary, it describes an antique principle, not a current priority. Today, we are more likely to talk of diversity—but diversification and desegregation are not the same undertaking. To speak of diversity, in light of this country’s history of racial recidivism, is to focus on bringing ethnic variety to largely white institutions, rather than dismantling the structures that made them so white to begin with.

Jelani Cobb on the failure of desegregation: http://nyr.kr/Qs3Ktj

(via newyorker)

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

Guardian and Washington Post win Pulitzer prize for NSA revelations

guardian:

The Guardian and the washingtonpost have been awarded the highest accolade in US journalism, winning the Pulitzer prize for public service for their groundbreaking articles on the National Security Agency’s surveillance activities based on the leaks of Edward Snowden.

The award, announced in New York on Monday, comes 10 months after the Guardian published the first report based on the leaks from Snowden, revealing the agency’s bulk collection of US citizens’ phone records. Full story

(Source: theguardian.com)

newyorker:

Sarah Larson on the 2014 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony: http://nyr.kr/1eAYSxB

“At the night’s end, Nirvana—who had suffered more than any other inductee, and had complained about nothing—brought everybody to a higher plane. Hearing Nirvana there felt much the way hearing Nirvana had in the first place, circa ‘Bleach’ and ‘Nevermind.’ It was the sound of joy, rage, crisis, calm, love, vitality: the reason we love rock and roll.”

Above: Kim Gordon, Joan Jett, St. Vincent, and Lorde, who played with Nirvana. Photograph by Theo Wargo/WireImage/Getty.

newyorker:

Sarah Larson on the 2014 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony: http://nyr.kr/1eAYSxB

“At the night’s end, Nirvana—who had suffered more than any other inductee, and had complained about nothing—brought everybody to a higher plane. Hearing Nirvana there felt much the way hearing Nirvana had in the first place, circa ‘Bleach’ and ‘Nevermind.’ It was the sound of joy, rage, crisis, calm, love, vitality: the reason we love rock and roll.”

Above: Kim Gordon, Joan Jett, St. Vincent, and Lorde, who played with Nirvana. Photograph by Theo Wargo/WireImage/Getty.

(Source: newyorker.com)

The most significant impacts of the Internet on people’s lives by 2025 will involve augmented reality applications. Augmented reality tools such as AR mobile browsers (like Layar) or wearables (like Google Glass) will become affordable and widespread, and we will grow accustomed to seeing the world through multiple data layers. This will change a lot of social practices, such as dating, job interviewing and professional networking, and gaming, as well as policing and espionage.

Daren C. Brabham, assistant professor at the Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism, University of Southern California, on what digital life will be like in 2025.

Today, Google Glass is being made available to the public.

(via pewinternet)

hipsterlibertarian:

From Reason:

The Federal Bureau of Investigation’s plan to tag and track us all is going swimmingly, from a creepy, voyeuristic perspective, according to federal documents. Released by the FBI in response to a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), the records reveal plans to stick the mugs of almost one in six Americans into the Next Generation Identification (NGI) program’s facial recognition database by next year.
Combined with the more than 120 million faces in state databases and the feds’ tolerance for a remarkably high false-positive rate, your chances of getting fingered for somebody else’s misdeeds are getting pretty good.

hipsterlibertarian:

From Reason:

The Federal Bureau of Investigation’s plan to tag and track us all is going swimmingly, from a creepy, voyeuristic perspective, according to federal documents. Released by the FBI in response to a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), the records reveal plans to stick the mugs of almost one in six Americans into the Next Generation Identification (NGI) program’s facial recognition database by next year.

Combined with the more than 120 million faces in state databases and the feds’ tolerance for a remarkably high false-positive rate, your chances of getting fingered for somebody else’s misdeeds are getting pretty good.

(via ilovecharts)